Terminology of SIR, DEMOCRACY & CITIZEN

citizen; Person who is entitled to enjoy all the legal rights and privileges granted by a state to the people comprising its constituency, and is obligated to obey its laws and to fulfill his or duties as called upon. Also called national. See also domicile and resident.

Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/citizen.html#ixzz3RtKPzfU0

sir; “Sir” derives from the Middle French honorific title sire. Sire developed alongside the word seigneur, also used to refer to a feudal lord. Both derived from theVulgar Latin senior, sire comes from the oblique case declision senior and seigneur, the nominative case declision seniōrem.
Democracy; The term originates from the Greek δημοκρατία (dēmokratía) “rule of the people”,[2] which was found from δῆμος (dêmos) “people” and κράτος (krátos) “power” or “rule” in the 5th century BC to denote the political systems then existing in Greek city-states, notably Athens; the term is an antonym to ἀριστοκρατία (aristokratía) “rule of an elite”. While theoretically these definitions are in opposition, in practice the distinction has been blurred historically.democracy is a form of government where citizens participate in government by choosing the government through free and fair elections and the politicians represent their constituents. Democracies ensure active participation of the citizens in politics and civic life.[1] In a democratic society, eligible citizens are able to vote for the passing or rejecting of laws, run for office during elections, join political parties, sit on boards or committees, criticize or protest against the government, and receive a fair trial if accused of breaking the country’s laws. Politicians represent their constituents in the proposal, development and establishment of the laws by which their society is run.[citation needed]

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s